Dental Infections

May 29th, 2024

Dr. Meuselbach and our team at Robert Scott Meuselbach DDS will tell you that dental infections can be very serious; sometimes, they develop into a life-threatening situation. Cavities are caused by acid-generating microorganisms that deposit themselves on teeth surfaces. Over time, acid erodes tooth enamel, compromising tooth strength. The major culprit or cause of cavities is sweets, but even diet soda plays a substantial role in tooth erosion, largely because the phosphoric acid it contains alters the oral pH. Cavities can pave the way for other, more serious infections to develop.

Types of infections

Pulpitis

Pulpitis is an inflammation of the tooth pulp. It typically occurs when cavities get deep enough to allow infection to reach the pulp. When this happens, bacteria travel through the pit or fissure that the cavity created. It can also develop from a fractured tooth. The symptoms may include moderate pain that comes and goes. Pain may intensify when cold liquids touch the pulp.

Periodontitis

Periodontitis is a consequence of chronic gingivitis, which occurs when the supportive bone structure of the tooth erodes, causing the periodontal tooth ligament to detach from the tooth. Kids between the ages of 12 and 17 and adults over age 30 are most likely to develop this disease. In severe cases of periodontitis, a periodontal abscess may form. Symptoms of the infection typically include redness, sensitivity to touch, and swelling.

Pericoronitis

Pericoronitis is an infection that occurs when food particles and other microorganisms get trapped under gum flaps. It typically happens when impacted wisdom teeth erupt. Pain at the site of the infection is a common symptom. You should try to prevent food particles from lodging in the gingivitis flaps.

Dental abscesses

A dental abscess is one of the most serious dental infections anyone can get. It begins at the base of the tooth, but without treatment can spread rapidly. When the abscess is more severe, the bacteria spread, often very rapidly, and cause severe facial swelling, pain, and discomfort.

The best way to minimize the risk of developing a dental infection is by practicing good oral hygiene, making sure that food or other particles aren’t trapped between the teeth for too long, flossing, using oral rinses that bear the ADA seal of approval, and seeing the dentist regularly. If or when there are any symptoms of infection, even if the only symptom is pain, be sure to visit the dentist. Early intervention may prevent the infection from escalating into something far more severe, painful, and costly to treat.

To learn more about dental infections, or to schedule an appointment with Dr. Meuselbach, please give us a call at our convenient West Chester office!

Dangers of Thumb Sucking

May 29th, 2024

It’s common for children to suck their thumb at a young age. Dr. Meuselbach and our team want you to understand the potential issues that can surface down the road if the habit isn’t broken early on.

It’s normal for infants to explore the function of their mouths by putting objects like their thumbs inside it. You shouldn’t be concerned if your baby regularly sucks his or her thumb. For infants who are still growing their baby teeth, thumb sucking can help with stimulating growth and development of their baby teeth.

Thumb sucking is not a problem among infants because they generally do it to sooth and comfort themselves. Problems can occur of kids continue the habit when their baby teeth begin to fall out, around six years of age.

If you have a young child whose adult teeth are starting to come in, that’s when thumb sucking can start to be a problem. Most children stop thumb sucking between the ages of two and three years. According to the American Dental Association, if thumb sucking continues as adult teeth come in, this can lead to problems involving improper alignment of teeth and growth of the jaw, gums, and roof of the mouth.

It may also affect your child’s speech after that, by causing a lisp or other speech impediments. As a parent, you may need to begin to regulate and intervene if thumb sucking starts to become a bigger problem for your child.

How to Stop Thumb Sucking

  • Provide comfort to your child if thumb sucking happens when he or she is anxious.
  • Limit thumb sucking initially to bedtime or naptime.
  • Employ positive reinforcement for good behavior.
  • Talk with your child about the potential problems that come from this habit.
  • Distract your son or daughter with activities such as fun games any time you notice it starting.
  • Involve your little one in choosing methods for stopping, like positive rewards.
  • Have Dr. Meuselbach talk to your child to reinforce concerns about thumb sucking.

Don’t forget that thumb sucking is a common habit that many children indulge in, and it should not be a concern right away. If you’re worried about your child’s thumb-sucking habit, start to address the issue as soon as possible.

The above techniques can help to reduce the amount of time your child sucks a thumb. Dr. Meuselbach and our team are here to help you if you have any questions or concerns about this habit.

Feel free to call our West Chester office and we will be happy to help you and your child.

The Stages of Gum Disease

May 28th, 2024

Taking care of your gums is one of the best ways to protect your smile. But sometimes, we treat our gums like an afterthought when it comes to dental care. It might surprise you to learn just how common gum disease is—and how damaging it can be for your oral health.

Surprising Fact #1:

About half of all adults have suffered or are suffering from some form of gum disease. And about half of all children do, too. As we age, the percentages jump—in fact, some studies estimate that eventually 70% of older adults will be affected by gum disease.

Surprising Fact #2:

The major cause of tooth loss in adults isn’t tooth decay or accidents or aging—it’s gum disease.

Surprising Fact #3:

Gum disease is progressive. The gingivitis that begins with a bit of redness or some minor bleeding when you brush might seem like a temporary annoyance. But when ignored, this early form of gum disease can lead to periodontitis, a serious gum condition which causes receding gums, loose teeth, bone and tissue damage, infections, and tooth loss.

Gingivitis

Gum disease begins quietly and invisibly, and it usually starts with plaque. Plaque along the gum line irritates our gum tissue. The body’s immune system responds and triggers inflammation. Gum tissue becomes swollen and red. The gums might feel tender, or bleed easily when you brush or floss.

If you’ve experienced any of these symptoms, it’s time to call our West Chester office. Dr. Meuselbach might recommend better brushing and flossing habits, a professional cleaning, and/or an anti-plaque treatment. At this stage, with proper care, gingivitis is reversible.

But left untreated, gingivitis can progress over time until it becomes periodontitis. Periodontitis affects not only gum tissue, but the bone and connective tissue which surround our teeth, supporting them and holding them firmly in place.

Mild Periodontitis

As plaque and tartar continue to irritate gum tissue above and below the gum line, inflammation increases, and the gums begin to pull away from the teeth. This is a problem, because the gums normally surround the tooth roots snugly, protecting them from plaque, bacteria, and other toxins.

When gum tissue pulls away, pockets are created between gums and teeth. These pockets become home to more bacteria, causing more irritation, inflammation, and infection. During this phase, the connective and bone tissue around the tooth’s roots might start to break down.

Moderate Periodontitis

As the disease progresses, pockets become deeper. The structures that hold the teeth in place continue to break down, and the teeth start to loosen. As the gums recede, tooth roots become more vulnerable to decay.

Advanced Periodontitis

When periodontitis has reached the advanced stage, there is significant loss of tissue and bone around the teeth. Teeth become looser and foul breath, pus, and pain when biting or chewing are common. Without prompt treatment, there’s a high risk of tooth loss.

Unlike gingivitis, periodontitis isn’t reversible, and requires professional care. Advanced treatments can do a lot to restore gum health:

  • Topical, time-release, or oral medications treat infection.
  • Scaling and root planing, which are non-surgical deep cleaning procedures, remove plaque and tartar above and below the gum line, and smooth tooth roots to remove bacteria and help the gum tissue reattach to the teeth.
  • Flap surgery treats more advanced gum infection, reducing pocket depth and re-securing the gums snugly around the teeth.
  • Bone grafts, gum grafts, and other regenerative procedures are available that help restore and repair tissue damaged by gum disease.

That’s good news, and there’s even better news: Because gum disease is typically triggered by plaque, it’s very preventable.

  • Brush carefully at least twice each day for at least two minutes. Don’t forget to brush along the gum line!
  • Use floss at least once each day or as directed by Dr. Meuselbach. If you have trouble flossing, ask us for the flossing tools and techniques that will work best for you.
  • See your dentist regularly to catch and treat early gum disease while it is still reversible.

While gum health is essential for dental health, healthy gums might mean more than just healthy teeth. Scientists are studying the potential links between gum disease and its effects on conditions such as heart disease, diabetes, and arthritis. Gum health should never be an afterthought. Taking care of your gums is one of the best things you can do to ensure a lifetime of healthy smiles.

Why do wisdom teeth need to be removed?

May 28th, 2024

Sometime around the late teens or early twenties, people’s wisdom teeth start to erupt. These are the third and final set of molars. When wisdom teeth come in properly — meaning they are correctly aligned — they offer more chewing power. Unfortunately, more often than not, wisdom teeth are misaligned, crowd other teeth, and need to be removed.

Why do we have wisdom teeth?

It is thought that we have wisdom teeth because — back in the day — we ate a diet that consisted of more rough foods, like roots, leaves, and meat, all of which required more heavy-duty chewing power.

Reasons Wisdom Teeth Need to be Removed

While there is no clear-cut rule that says every single person needs to have their wisdom teeth removed, there are certain situations where one or more wisdom teeth are causing a problem or have a strong likelihood that problems will eventually arise in the future that warrant their removal.

1. Fully Impacted Wisdom Teeth

When a wisdom tooth is “impacted”, it means that the tooth is covered by gum tissue, thereby preventing it from erupting through the gum. This often occurs when the mouth is too small to allow enough room for the tooth to emerge. Because bacteria, food, or other mouth substances can be lodged under the gum that covers the wisdom tooth, it can lead to an acute abscess, known as pericoronitis.

2. Partially Impacted Wisdom Teeth

When a wisdom tooth is partially impacted, meaning the tooth is partially emerged from the gums, it almost always is advised to be removed. Because of its location in the very back of the mouth, a partially erupted wisdom tooth is more susceptible to not only decay and cavities, but also gum disease.

3. Other Reasons to Have Wisdom Teeth Removed

If you experience any of the below dental issues or changes in your dental health, removal of your wisdom tooth (teeth) may be necessary:

  • Pain at or surrounding the wisdom tooth site, including the jaw or cheek area
  • Repetitive infections
  • Gum disease
  • Tooth decay (extensive)
  • Tumors
  • Cysts
  • Damage to surrounding teeth

It is important to know that the decision to have a wisdom tooth removed isn’t always cut and dry. It is essential to talk to Dr. Meuselbach about the alignment of your wisdom teeth if they have already erupted, health of your wisdom teeth if impacted or partially impacted, and your overall dental health to determine what is best for your situation. Contact our West Chester office to schedule an appointment today!